DQ10

DQ10
Name
Institution

DQ10
Several techniques can be applied to ensure that the crime scene is sterile. One such technique entails protecting the scene thoroughly. Subsequently, establishing the scene’s dimensionality should be top priority. Therefore, putting a barrier tape marked “crime scene” with extra words of “do not cross” is necessary to indicate the areas where the public and other law enforcers are not allowed to access (Wallace, Cunningham & Boggiano, 2015). This way, the risk of contamination is reduced. Establishing a command post is also important. This serves to keep the scene sterile by restricting the access of staff to the scene and identifying individuals who enter and leave the scene. Ensuring that the investigating personnel disinfect their equipment prior to and after accessing the scene of crime is another crucial technique. Equipment that must be disinfected encompasses, but is not restricted to, their note pads, clothing, and photography, sketching, and processing equipment.
Crime scene staff should also follow a protocol of collection of evidence that prevents contamination and destruction of evidence. Such an order of gathering evidence should entail recovering the trace fibers, hairs first, followed by tool marks, biological fluid, footwear patterns/fingerprints, then lastly, latent patterns that need chemical enhancement or powder (Wallace, Cunningham & Boggiano, 2015). Other techniques include handling evidence with disposable gloves, air-drying evidence thoroughly before packaging it in sterile containers, and avoiding talking and coughing over evidence. A sterile crime scene is necessary to preserve evidence and maintain its integrity. This way, when the evidence is analyzed, it will be able to point out to the perpetrator(s) of the crime and how the crime was committed accurately. Even when the evidence is presented in court, attorneys on both sides will not be able to discredit it. Eventually, the non-contaminated evidence will assist in delivering justice.

Reference
Wallace, E. W., Cunningham, M. J., & Boggiano, D. (2015). Crime scene unit management: A path forward. Routledge.